bobbycaputo:

A Day in the Life of the Ku Klux Klan, Uncensored

Photographer Anthony Karen’s use of the word sir in emails might stem from his service in the Marine Corps. It could also be indicative of his humanitarian side and his affiliations with charities including Friends in DeedSmile Train, and the Humane Society.

That simple level of politeness is also a small window into how he has been able to document as a photojournalist many of the most feared, secretive, and marginalized pockets of society around the world.

On his website, Karen writes that his passion for photography began during a trip to Haiti, where he documented Vodou rituals around the country. From there he has created series about Skinheads, the Westboro Baptist Church, and the Ku Klux Klan.

Gaining access to secretive pockets of society is based upon trust, something Karen doesn’t take lightly and that he sees as a foundation of photojournalism. “It’s a moment that’s constantly validated, the wordless acceptance into someone’s personal space with a camera,” Karen wrote via email.

(via laughterkey)

photojournalism photography ku klux klan history south confederacy Confederate States of America documentary Anthony Karen

alaskanbman:

The Arm of Liberty, 1876-1882

  ‘The arm and torch of the Statue of Liberty in Madison Square Park, New York. These portions of the Statue were exhibited to raise funds for the completion of the statue and its pedestal. The arm and torch remained in the park from 1876 until 1882.

‘Members of the public could pay fifty cents to climb to the balcony of the torch.’

(via obama2016)

news history New York City Statue of Liberty Madison Square Park

npr:

buzzfeed:

Make it rain, Jane Austen.

I saw this as I scrolled through and though, “No… is that REAL?!” Looks like it is! 
The head of the Bank of England explains, “Jane Austen certainly merits a place in the select group of historical figures to appear on our banknotes … Her novels have an enduring and universal appeal and she is recognized as one of the greatest writers in English literature.”
Paging @NPRBooks! —Sarah

npr:

buzzfeed:

Make it rain, Jane Austen.

I saw this as I scrolled through and though, “No… is that REAL?!” Looks like it is! 

The head of the Bank of England explains, “Jane Austen certainly merits a place in the select group of historical figures to appear on our banknotes … Her novels have an enduring and universal appeal and she is recognized as one of the greatest writers in English literature.”

Paging @NPRBooks! —Sarah

news England currency money Jane Austen literature novels history NPR

transitmaps:

Historical Map: New York Metropolitan Transit Authority 1968 Plan for Rail Improvement and Transit Expansion

Courtesy of the new and already indispensable hyperrealcartography Tumblr, here’s a simply stunning set of New York transit planning maps from the late 60s.

In this modern age of computer-aided map design, a lot of time can be spent trying to digitally replicate this watercolour look, but it’s hard to beat the real thing (although Stamen’s lovely map tiles do a pretty good job!).

The north pointer — successfully and cleverly integrating the then-brand-new MTA logo — is also worthy of note.

(Source: hyperrealcartography)

(via wnyc)

nyc New York City MTA subway transit history

fotojournalismus:

On this day : November 9, 1989 – The Fall of the Berlin Wall

(via)

The Berlin Wall was a barrier constructed by East Germany starting on August 13, 1961, that completely cut off (by land) West Berlin from surrounding East Germany and from East Berlin. The barrier included guard towers placed along large concrete walls, which circumscribed a wide area (later known as the “death strip”) that contained anti-vehicle trenches, “fakir beds” and other defenses. The Wall served to prevent the massive emigration and defection that marked Germany and the communist Eastern Bloc during the post-World War II period. Around 5,000 people attempted to escape over the wall, with estimates of the resulting death toll varying between 100 and 200.

In 1989, several weeks of civil unrest, the East German government announced on November 9, 1989 that all GDR citizens could visit West Germany and West Berlin. Crowds of East Germans crossed and climbed onto the wall, joined by West Germans on the other side in a celebratory atmosphere. Over the next few weeks, a euphoric public and souvenir hunters chipped away parts of the wall; the governments later used industrial equipment to remove most of the rest. The physical Wall itself was primarily destroyed in 1990.

Pictures : 

1. East German border guards look through a hole in the Berlin wall after demonstrators pulled down one segment of the wall at Brandenburg gate Saturday, November 11, 1989. (AP Photo/Lionel Cironneau)

2. East Berliners get helping hands from West Berliners as they climb the Berlin Wall which has divided the city since the end of World War II, near the Brandenburger Tor (Branderburg Gate), early Friday morning, November 10, 1989. The citizens facing the West celebrate the opening of the order that was announced by the East German Communist government hours before. (AP Photo/Jockel Finck)

3. Berliners from East and West crowd in front of the Brandenburger Tor (Branderburg Gate), early Friday morning, November 10, 1989, standing atop and below the Berlin Wall, which has divided the city since the end of World War II. The citizens facing the West celebrate the opening of the order that was announced by the East German Communist government hours before. (AP Photo/Jockel Finck)

4. East German citizens are applauded by West Berliners when they cross Checkpoint Charlie with their cars to visit West Berlin, Nov. 10, 1989. Thousands of East Germans moved into West Berlin after the opening of the wall by East German government. (AP Photo/Thomas Kienzle)

5. East German border policemen, right, refuse to shake hands with a Berliner who stretches out his hand over the border fence at the eastern site nearby Checkpoint Charlie border crossing point, Friday morning, November 10, 1989, after the borders were opened according to the announcement by the East German government. (AP Photo/Lutz Schmidt)

6. Typical of East Berlin measures to halt the escape of refugees to the west are these bricked-up windows in an apartment house along the city’s dividing line on Oct. 6, 1961. The house, on the South side of Bernauerstrasse, is in East Berlin. The sidewalk and street in the foreground are in West Berlin. (AP Photo)

7. Reverend Martin Luther King, American civil rights leader, invited to Berlin by West Berlin Mayor Willy Brandt, visits on September 13, 1964 the red wall. Here he is seen at the border Potsdamer Platz, West Berlin, Germany. (AP Photo)

8. Wooden memorial for Ida Siekmann, 58, who jumped to death in an attempt to escape on August 22, 1961. Ruins in rear are part of the Berlin Wall at Bernauer Strasse in Berlin in an undated photo. (AP Photo)

9. Father and son riding their bicycles along a section of the Berlin Wall, July 1981. (AP Photo)

Berlin Wall history Germany

"I majored in #11 and then a version of #13 in undergrad and ended up with a Masters in #8. Looking down this list, it seems these are the majors that make you happy instead of making you rich. They also seem to be degrees that prepare someone to contribute thoughtful or beautiful things to the world. I think we need a new definition of useless."
-

Amor Fati: The 13 Most Useless College Majors (As Determined By Science)   (via newsweek)

sjriley

I’m repping a double major in #8 and #12. Fati makes me not hate my life as much. 

(via newsweek)

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