wired:

Last Christmas, photographer Wes Naman and his assistant Joy Godfrey were wrapping presents in Naman’s photo studio when Godfrey randomly put a piece of scotch tape on her nose and pulled it into an awkward position. Naman followed suit by applying the tape to his lips.
Seeing the silliness contained in a simple household item turned a light on in Naman’s head. Fast-forward one year and the idea has blossomed into a project he calls Scotch Tape, in which he uses this pliable plastic to completely cover and distort people into zombie-like caricatures of themselves.
“I thought it would just be a fun side project but as it started to progress people really started to get into character and go over the top,” says Naman, who is based in Albuquerque, New Mexico.
See more of the smushy-fun over @ Raw File.

wired:

Last Christmas, photographer Wes Naman and his assistant Joy Godfrey were wrapping presents in Naman’s photo studio when Godfrey randomly put a piece of scotch tape on her nose and pulled it into an awkward position. Naman followed suit by applying the tape to his lips.

Seeing the silliness contained in a simple household item turned a light on in Naman’s head. Fast-forward one year and the idea has blossomed into a project he calls Scotch Tape, in which he uses this pliable plastic to completely cover and distort people into zombie-like caricatures of themselves.

“I thought it would just be a fun side project but as it started to progress people really started to get into character and go over the top,” says Naman, who is based in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

See more of the smushy-fun over @ Raw File.

(Source: Wired, via flavorpill)

news art Wes Naman

theatlantic:

Can You Tell a City By Its Blocks?

What if city blocks could be extracted, isolated, stripped of all but their essential form, and lined up like soldiers for inspection? Would we know Paris or Berlin by the sum of their parts?

French artist Armelle Caron has satisfied this curiosity in “Tout bien rangé,” an assembly of what Caron calls “graphic anagrams” of well-known cities. The series, whose title translates roughly as “All in order,” is composed of digital images of cities printed on canvas — cities whole and cities disassembled, catalogs of parts for some Borgesian Ikea project.

Read more. [Images: Armelle Caron]

art cities Armelle Caron

Instagram, The Nostalgia Of Now And Reckoning The Future
Via BuzzFeed

"Feeling nostalgic for a time you never actually knew is a deeply unsettling contemporary phenomenon. For some people, it means clawing through junk shops in pursuit of the perfect brass-lensed tailboard camera, but for most of us, it means applying the Lord Kelvin filter to a hasty snapshot of last night’s dessert. So is that vague, manufactured nostalgia culturally toxic, per Simon Reynolds’ Retromania (and the cavalcade of nervous think-y reviews it inspired)? Maybe – but it’s weirdly gratifying, too, tapping into the sense “that a photograph is itself a precious object,” as New York Magazine put it recently.”

Instagram, The Nostalgia Of Now And Reckoning The Future

Via BuzzFeed

"Feeling nostalgic for a time you never actually knew is a deeply unsettling contemporary phenomenon. For some people, it means clawing through junk shops in pursuit of the perfect brass-lensed tailboard camera, but for most of us, it means applying the Lord Kelvin filter to a hasty snapshot of last night’s dessert. So is that vague, manufactured nostalgia culturally toxic, per Simon Reynolds’ Retromania (and the cavalcade of nervous think-y reviews it inspired)? Maybe – but it’s weirdly gratifying, too, tapping into the sense “that a photograph is itself a precious object,” as New York Magazine put it recently.”

news Instagram photography vintage art iPhone app

joshsternberg:

“American Girl in Italy”

 
“Some people want to use it as a symbol of harassment of women, but that’s what we’ve been fighting all these years,” Craig said in a telephone interview from her home in Toronto. “It’s not a symbol of harassment. It’s a symbol of a woman having an absolutely wonderful time!”
Back in 1951, Craig was a carefree 23-year-old who had chucked her job in New York and secured third-class accommodations on a ship bound for Europe. She spent more than six months making her way through France, Spain and Italy all by herself — something very few women did in the years following World War II.
She traveled as inexpensively as she could, so she was thrilled when she found a hotel right on the Arno River in Florence where she could stay for $1 a day. There, she met another adventurous solo female traveler: Ruth Orkin, a 29-year-old photographer who came to Italy after completing an assignment in Israel.

 
You know how when you just visit a place, that place keeps popping up over and over again? Well, this is MUCH better than seeing the American idiots (those of the “Jersey Shore” kind) in Florence.
(h/t @melanierenzulli)

joshsternberg:

“American Girl in Italy”

 

“Some people want to use it as a symbol of harassment of women, but that’s what we’ve been fighting all these years,” Craig said in a telephone interview from her home in Toronto. “It’s not a symbol of harassment. It’s a symbol of a woman having an absolutely wonderful time!”

Back in 1951, Craig was a carefree 23-year-old who had chucked her job in New York and secured third-class accommodations on a ship bound for Europe. She spent more than six months making her way through France, Spain and Italy all by herself — something very few women did in the years following World War II.

She traveled as inexpensively as she could, so she was thrilled when she found a hotel right on the Arno River in Florence where she could stay for $1 a day. There, she met another adventurous solo female traveler: Ruth Orkin, a 29-year-old photographer who came to Italy after completing an assignment in Israel.

 

You know how when you just visit a place, that place keeps popping up over and over again? Well, this is MUCH better than seeing the American idiots (those of the “Jersey Shore” kind) in Florence.

(h/t @melanierenzulli)

(Source: joshsternberg)

Art Black and White Italy Florence Ninalee Craig Ruth Orkin Photography